Flooring options: how do you choose?

Flooring options: how do you choose?

There are five key things to consider when choosing flooring options for your home.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

It wasn’t so long ago that carpeting bathrooms was all the rage—a shag plush pile carpet running up the wall of your bath or around your toilet was a true fashion statement. Thankfully, times and fashions have changed and consumers have become far more practically minded in their flooring choices. That said, there are now so many options available it’s difficult to know where to start. To help you decide, Award Carpets’ Karl Wallace outlines five simple ways to narrow down your options.

1. How will you use the house?

Every household has different needs and will use their home in a different way, so Karl says a great place to begin is to assess the needs of the household. Do you have pets or children? Is there direct exposure to sun in parts of the house? Is there anyone with allergies? Which areas will be your high foot-traffic areas? How do you want the house to feel as you transition from one space to another?

“You’re looking at what the use of each area will be, as well as what sort of flow you’re trying to create,” says Karl.

Additionally, it’s important to know how long you plan to be in the house and if resale is a factor.

“For those looking for an option that has mass appeal, we’re finding lighter shades of carpet are preferable because they make the space feel open—a nice warm grey tone seems to be popular at the moment.”

2. Wool versus nylon

The debate between wool and nylon carpets is ongoing—both have their pros and cons and there is no clear winner.

There are currently 68 different nylon fibres on the market—from entry level nylon fibres right up to solution-dyed nylon—and they all wear differently.

Karl says there are also great gains being made in the sustainability of producing nylon carpet.

“Each manufacturer, depending on where the carpet is made, has different criteria on how to reach that sustainability component. Some of the nylons that are coming from overseas have very low water use and zero waste. But nylon fibres are created from plastic, which has a negative connotation to it.”

In contrast, wool fibres are natural and recyclable, however there’s a huge water component to their production, due to the process of being scoured. For some this outweighs the benefits of using it.

Additionally, high sun exposure on wool carpets can cause fading and, because the fibre is a natural protein, it can take up stains more readily.

“There’s no perfect answer, as there is nothing on the market that ticks all those sustainability and practicality boxes.”

The important thing, says Karl, is to look at how your household lives and what will be the most suitable product. There are stainproof nylons for families with young children and animals, as well as stain resistant carpets (which have limited warranties).

“There’re so many products out on the market and they’re all so different, with different capabilities, so ask questions. Manufacturers are very black-and-white about what their products do and don’t do—so read up on the warranties on their websites.”

3. Hard flooring: know its capabilities

There’s been a huge trend towards installing hard flooring in modern living spaces, but again, there are so many options it can be difficult to pinpoint the right one.

There’s engineered timber, solid timber, laminate, waterproof laminate, vinyl and vinyl planks. Each option has its pros and cons.

Karl says the first thing to consider is whether you need the area to be waterproof—such as in a kitchen or bathroom, because not all products are equal.

“It’s about getting the right protective layer for hard flooring. There’s a big difference between a water proof product that uses a waterproof system and one that doesn’t.”

Waterproof products installed with waterproof systems ensure that the joins are waterproof too, which means the product creates a continuous surface that is impervious to water.

“It’s crucial to really do your homework on what you’re purchasing, where it comes from and what it really does. Some timbers, when you spill water on them, stain straight away and you will never get rid of that damage. You may not have chosen that product if you had known that when you bought it.”

Vinyl flooring can be an answer to waterproofing issues, however not everyone likes the feel underfoot. In contrast, engineered timber is beautiful and popular in high-end homes, but it does fade, can move and it will dent if you drop a bowl on it.

Essentially your hard-flooring choice comes down to personal preference. If you want a product that looks good, suits the needs of the household and lasts for a long time, you’ve really got to do your homework.

4. Flow: how to make seamless transitions

Flooring makes a huge visual impact in a space and can be helpful in creating a sense of flow. Karl says the most popular way clients are creating flow currently is by choosing a hard flooring that is carried through the living, kitchen, hallway and bathroom spaces.

“In the past, the hallway and bedrooms were carpeted, but this means those spaces were visually cut off from the living spaces. Carpeting only the bedrooms is a great way of making a home feel more spacious.”

Colour palettes are also an easy way to enhance a seamless flow, or to delineate different areas.

“The flow comes down to the transition points—if you’ve got white timber and a dark carpet, you’re separating those areas, whereas if you’ve got a timber and carpet that are similar in tone and warmth, then the space feels larger and more open.”

The trims used to join spaces should also be sympathetic to the flooring products used, and Karl says if you want to achieve a luxury look, brass is a popular choose.

5. Designing a whole space: colour and texture

Regardless of whether your home is a new build or a heritage home, it needn’t restrict your choice of flooring—it’s about creating a space that you’ll enjoy; there’s no right or wrong answer.

Social media channels such as Pinterest; design magazines; and websites such as ArchiPro.co.nz; are all great ways you can hone in on designs, textures and colour palettes that look great.

“You can actually find the designs and colours that work online, that way you’re not trying to piece together individual elements. On ArchiPro.co.nz you can see finished examples with a complete look and you can replicate it – there’s no need to reinvent the wheel!”

Learn more about choosing the right flooring product for your next project.

Award Flooring

Award Flooring provides quality flooring and carpets and an excellent service. Based in Auckland for 33 years we provide a wide range of flooring products from many NZ...

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Flooring options: how do you choose?

Flooring options: how do you choose?

There are five key things to consider when choosing flooring options for your home.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

It wasn’t so long ago that carpeting bathrooms was all the rage—a shag plush pile carpet running up the wall of your bath or around your toilet was a true fashion statement. Thankfully, times and fashions have changed and consumers have become far more practically minded in their flooring choices. That said, there are now so many options available it’s difficult to know where to start. To help you decide, Award Carpets’ Karl Wallace outlines five simple ways to narrow down your options.

1. How will you use the house?

Every household has different needs and will use their home in a different way, so Karl says a great place to begin is to assess the needs of the household. Do you have pets or children? Is there direct exposure to sun in parts of the house? Is there anyone with allergies? Which areas will be your high foot-traffic areas? How do you want the house to feel as you transition from one space to another?

“You’re looking at what the use of each area will be, as well as what sort of flow you’re trying to create,” says Karl.

Additionally, it’s important to know how long you plan to be in the house and if resale is a factor.

“For those looking for an option that has mass appeal, we’re finding lighter shades of carpet are preferable because they make the space feel open—a nice warm grey tone seems to be popular at the moment.”

2. Wool versus nylon

The debate between wool and nylon carpets is ongoing—both have their pros and cons and there is no clear winner.

There are currently 68 different nylon fibres on the market—from entry level nylon fibres right up to solution-dyed nylon—and they all wear differently.

Karl says there are also great gains being made in the sustainability of producing nylon carpet.

“Each manufacturer, depending on where the carpet is made, has different criteria on how to reach that sustainability component. Some of the nylons that are coming from overseas have very low water use and zero waste. But nylon fibres are created from plastic, which has a negative connotation to it.”

In contrast, wool fibres are natural and recyclable, however there’s a huge water component to their production, due to the process of being scoured. For some this outweighs the benefits of using it.

Additionally, high sun exposure on wool carpets can cause fading and, because the fibre is a natural protein, it can take up stains more readily.

“There’s no perfect answer, as there is nothing on the market that ticks all those sustainability and practicality boxes.”

The important thing, says Karl, is to look at how your household lives and what will be the most suitable product. There are stainproof nylons for families with young children and animals, as well as stain resistant carpets (which have limited warranties).

“There’re so many products out on the market and they’re all so different, with different capabilities, so ask questions. Manufacturers are very black-and-white about what their products do and don’t do—so read up on the warranties on their websites.”

3. Hard flooring: know its capabilities

There’s been a huge trend towards installing hard flooring in modern living spaces, but again, there are so many options it can be difficult to pinpoint the right one.

There’s engineered timber, solid timber, laminate, waterproof laminate, vinyl and vinyl planks. Each option has its pros and cons.

Karl says the first thing to consider is whether you need the area to be waterproof—such as in a kitchen or bathroom, because not all products are equal.

“It’s about getting the right protective layer for hard flooring. There’s a big difference between a water proof product that uses a waterproof system and one that doesn’t.”

Waterproof products installed with waterproof systems ensure that the joins are waterproof too, which means the product creates a continuous surface that is impervious to water.

“It’s crucial to really do your homework on what you’re purchasing, where it comes from and what it really does. Some timbers, when you spill water on them, stain straight away and you will never get rid of that damage. You may not have chosen that product if you had known that when you bought it.”

Vinyl flooring can be an answer to waterproofing issues, however not everyone likes the feel underfoot. In contrast, engineered timber is beautiful and popular in high-end homes, but it does fade, can move and it will dent if you drop a bowl on it.

Essentially your hard-flooring choice comes down to personal preference. If you want a product that looks good, suits the needs of the household and lasts for a long time, you’ve really got to do your homework.

4. Flow: how to make seamless transitions

Flooring makes a huge visual impact in a space and can be helpful in creating a sense of flow. Karl says the most popular way clients are creating flow currently is by choosing a hard flooring that is carried through the living, kitchen, hallway and bathroom spaces.

“In the past, the hallway and bedrooms were carpeted, but this means those spaces were visually cut off from the living spaces. Carpeting only the bedrooms is a great way of making a home feel more spacious.”

Colour palettes are also an easy way to enhance a seamless flow, or to delineate different areas.

“The flow comes down to the transition points—if you’ve got white timber and a dark carpet, you’re separating those areas, whereas if you’ve got a timber and carpet that are similar in tone and warmth, then the space feels larger and more open.”

The trims used to join spaces should also be sympathetic to the flooring products used, and Karl says if you want to achieve a luxury look, brass is a popular choose.

5. Designing a whole space: colour and texture

Regardless of whether your home is a new build or a heritage home, it needn’t restrict your choice of flooring—it’s about creating a space that you’ll enjoy; there’s no right or wrong answer.

Social media channels such as Pinterest; design magazines; and websites such as ArchiPro.co.nz; are all great ways you can hone in on designs, textures and colour palettes that look great.

“You can actually find the designs and colours that work online, that way you’re not trying to piece together individual elements. On ArchiPro.co.nz you can see finished examples with a complete look and you can replicate it – there’s no need to reinvent the wheel!”

Learn more about choosing the right flooring product for your next project.

Get in touch with
Award Flooring

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Recommended reading
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Flooring options: how do you choose?

Flooring options: how do you choose?

There are five key things to consider when choosing flooring options for your home.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

It wasn’t so long ago that carpeting bathrooms was all the rage—a shag plush pile carpet running up the wall of your bath or around your toilet was a true fashion statement. Thankfully, times and fashions have changed and consumers have become far more practically minded in their flooring choices. That said, there are now so many options available it’s difficult to know where to start. To help you decide, Award Carpets’ Karl Wallace outlines five simple ways to narrow down your options.

1. How will you use the house?

Every household has different needs and will use their home in a different way, so Karl says a great place to begin is to assess the needs of the household. Do you have pets or children? Is there direct exposure to sun in parts of the house? Is there anyone with allergies? Which areas will be your high foot-traffic areas? How do you want the house to feel as you transition from one space to another?

“You’re looking at what the use of each area will be, as well as what sort of flow you’re trying to create,” says Karl.

Additionally, it’s important to know how long you plan to be in the house and if resale is a factor.

“For those looking for an option that has mass appeal, we’re finding lighter shades of carpet are preferable because they make the space feel open—a nice warm grey tone seems to be popular at the moment.”

2. Wool versus nylon

The debate between wool and nylon carpets is ongoing—both have their pros and cons and there is no clear winner.

There are currently 68 different nylon fibres on the market—from entry level nylon fibres right up to solution-dyed nylon—and they all wear differently.

Karl says there are also great gains being made in the sustainability of producing nylon carpet.

“Each manufacturer, depending on where the carpet is made, has different criteria on how to reach that sustainability component. Some of the nylons that are coming from overseas have very low water use and zero waste. But nylon fibres are created from plastic, which has a negative connotation to it.”

In contrast, wool fibres are natural and recyclable, however there’s a huge water component to their production, due to the process of being scoured. For some this outweighs the benefits of using it.

Additionally, high sun exposure on wool carpets can cause fading and, because the fibre is a natural protein, it can take up stains more readily.

“There’s no perfect answer, as there is nothing on the market that ticks all those sustainability and practicality boxes.”

The important thing, says Karl, is to look at how your household lives and what will be the most suitable product. There are stainproof nylons for families with young children and animals, as well as stain resistant carpets (which have limited warranties).

“There’re so many products out on the market and they’re all so different, with different capabilities, so ask questions. Manufacturers are very black-and-white about what their products do and don’t do—so read up on the warranties on their websites.”

3. Hard flooring: know its capabilities

There’s been a huge trend towards installing hard flooring in modern living spaces, but again, there are so many options it can be difficult to pinpoint the right one.

There’s engineered timber, solid timber, laminate, waterproof laminate, vinyl and vinyl planks. Each option has its pros and cons.

Karl says the first thing to consider is whether you need the area to be waterproof—such as in a kitchen or bathroom, because not all products are equal.

“It’s about getting the right protective layer for hard flooring. There’s a big difference between a water proof product that uses a waterproof system and one that doesn’t.”

Waterproof products installed with waterproof systems ensure that the joins are waterproof too, which means the product creates a continuous surface that is impervious to water.

“It’s crucial to really do your homework on what you’re purchasing, where it comes from and what it really does. Some timbers, when you spill water on them, stain straight away and you will never get rid of that damage. You may not have chosen that product if you had known that when you bought it.”

Vinyl flooring can be an answer to waterproofing issues, however not everyone likes the feel underfoot. In contrast, engineered timber is beautiful and popular in high-end homes, but it does fade, can move and it will dent if you drop a bowl on it.

Essentially your hard-flooring choice comes down to personal preference. If you want a product that looks good, suits the needs of the household and lasts for a long time, you’ve really got to do your homework.

4. Flow: how to make seamless transitions

Flooring makes a huge visual impact in a space and can be helpful in creating a sense of flow. Karl says the most popular way clients are creating flow currently is by choosing a hard flooring that is carried through the living, kitchen, hallway and bathroom spaces.

“In the past, the hallway and bedrooms were carpeted, but this means those spaces were visually cut off from the living spaces. Carpeting only the bedrooms is a great way of making a home feel more spacious.”

Colour palettes are also an easy way to enhance a seamless flow, or to delineate different areas.

“The flow comes down to the transition points—if you’ve got white timber and a dark carpet, you’re separating those areas, whereas if you’ve got a timber and carpet that are similar in tone and warmth, then the space feels larger and more open.”

The trims used to join spaces should also be sympathetic to the flooring products used, and Karl says if you want to achieve a luxury look, brass is a popular choose.

5. Designing a whole space: colour and texture

Regardless of whether your home is a new build or a heritage home, it needn’t restrict your choice of flooring—it’s about creating a space that you’ll enjoy; there’s no right or wrong answer.

Social media channels such as Pinterest; design magazines; and websites such as ArchiPro.co.nz; are all great ways you can hone in on designs, textures and colour palettes that look great.

“You can actually find the designs and colours that work online, that way you’re not trying to piece together individual elements. On ArchiPro.co.nz you can see finished examples with a complete look and you can replicate it – there’s no need to reinvent the wheel!”

Learn more about choosing the right flooring product for your next project.

Get in touch with
Award Flooring

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging