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Innovative system allows you to print your own house.

Words by Justin Foote

We’ve all seen the news reports of large construction firms folding, leaving contractors, clients and employees out of pocket and, oftentimes, out of options.

Razor-thin margins across the construction industry is often cited as one of the contributing factors in these companies’ collapse. Innovative solutions that help make the industry more efficient and effective, therefore, are eagerly anticipated.

One such innovation—cementitious 3D construction printing, also known as 3D concrete printing—is being championed by Hamilton-based company, QOROX.

“We’ve been offering this technology for around six months now and have seen some real uptake, especially by local council organisations,” says Managing Director, Wafaey Swelim.

“The technology was developed by a company called CyBe Construction, out of the Netherlands. Essentially it is a research and development company with a construction background and has a €100-million turnover.

“Since its inception in 2013, CyBe has completed projects in Dubai, Saudi Arabia and the Netherlands and sells its ‘printers’ globally.”

A special mortar—which can be coloured and comprises a fine sand mixed with a cementitious compound—is used to create a range of printed concrete structures, such as this park bench. The process creates no more than a single wheelbarrow-load of waste mate

QOROX: the future of construction

“The technology is still quite new, especially in New Zealand and it’s proponents are very much a collaborative community at this stage,” says Wafaey.

“What we’re looking to do is raise awareness of the capabilities of the system, particularly as pertains to design professionals—architects/architectural designers and landscape architects/designers—and really open up the community.”

Wafaey says design professionals will particularly like the online design portal, which they can use to find the desired design, customise it to their individual requirements and create a downloadable file that can then be uploaded to the printer. Designers can also create and upload their own designs to the portal.

The company has carried out several ‘live demonstrations’ around the country, usually in conjunction with local councils and Wafaey says the response from the general public is always one of amazement.

“People are astounded that we can print something like an architecturally designed park bench in just 30 minutes and that that same bench is ready for use in less than 24 hours. One of the great benefits of this system is that, unlike the traditional pre-cast method, ‘freeform’ designs are achievable. That said, there are some limitations—mostly to do with physics—so there aren’t infinite options available, but the system allows for some really creative solutions.”

The system has been designed for ease of use—requiring just two people to operate it.

QOROX: so simple an apprentice can use it

“While the system can be used as the sole construction method, the way we’re positioning the technology at the moment, is as an adjunct to the existing construction programme; offering efficiencies around time and costs and therefore allowing the programme to proceed to schedule.”

Agility is one of the biggest benefits the QOROX system has to offer, says Wafaey.

“The printer itself is easily transportable and only requires a 5m x 4m footprint making it an ideal choice for compromised sites. The actual printing of forms can be done either onsite or at an offsite facility—with each scenario having various advantages. The machine produces very little noise, so if printing onsite, especially in a commercial context, the machine could potentially run 24/7. The printing process, too, is highly agile, allowing for changes to be made on the fly.

“It also has better environmental impacts than traditional concrete methods. Each project generates around one wheelbarrow-load of waste product and CyBe is looking at ways of incorporating various commercial waste products into the mortar as a way of further reducing waste going to landfill.”

Use of the system is also a case study in simplicity, says Wafaey, requiring just two people to run it—a qualified builder and an apprentice—and, it only takes two weeks’ training to learn how to use the system.

As with the more recognised "home" 3D printers, the CyBe Construction machine is able to print complex shapes quickly and efficiently.

QOROX: partnering with the construction industry

“Another of the system’s benefits is that it can be used across a wide gamut of construction applications including: residential, group housing, emergency housing, social housing and even bespoke architectural houses; commercial: structural walls, slabs, exterior walls and feature walls; landscaping: benches, planters, sculptures, retaining walls, swimming pools walls, prefab toilet blocks, bollards, climbing walls, shelters and sea walls; roading: median reservation, acoustic walls, slippage barriers and cycling and pedestrian bridges, as well as a whole host of singular projects.

“The printer works at a ‘speed’ of 4.5m2/h and is capable of ‘printing’ a single-storey home in just one week. The mortar, which can be coloured, comprises a fine sand mixed with a cementitious compound. Unlike regular concrete, there are no additional aggregates. Different thicknesses of mortar can be specified depending on the project and the heights wanting to be achieved.

“Typically, on a residential project for example, once the wall is printed, it is cured after three minutes and set after five. Twenty-four hours later it is load bearing and after 28 days, the structure will have reached 50 MPa. It’s also fully finished and doesn’t require additional cladding products.

“Councils in particular have been quick to embrace the system but we’re also experiencing a lot of interest from the private sector. The feedback we’ve been getting is that this process is really going to take off. In short, it’s here now and has the potential to shape the industry in the very near future.”

Learn more about incorporating cementitious 3D construction printing into your next project.

QOROX®

Don’t build it. Print it. We bring your ideas to life. Our system offers you a completely different way of construction, no limit to your ideas, fast and effective, no...

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Innovative system allows you to print your own house.

Words by Justin Foote

We’ve all seen the news reports of large construction firms folding, leaving contractors, clients and employees out of pocket and, oftentimes, out of options.

Razor-thin margins across the construction industry is often cited as one of the contributing factors in these companies’ collapse. Innovative solutions that help make the industry more efficient and effective, therefore, are eagerly anticipated.

One such innovation—cementitious 3D construction printing, also known as 3D concrete printing—is being championed by Hamilton-based company, QOROX.

“We’ve been offering this technology for around six months now and have seen some real uptake, especially by local council organisations,” says Managing Director, Wafaey Swelim.

“The technology was developed by a company called CyBe Construction, out of the Netherlands. Essentially it is a research and development company with a construction background and has a €100-million turnover.

“Since its inception in 2013, CyBe has completed projects in Dubai, Saudi Arabia and the Netherlands and sells its ‘printers’ globally.”

A special mortar—which can be coloured and comprises a fine sand mixed with a cementitious compound—is used to create a range of printed concrete structures, such as this park bench. The process creates no more than a single wheelbarrow-load of waste mate

QOROX: the future of construction

“The technology is still quite new, especially in New Zealand and it’s proponents are very much a collaborative community at this stage,” says Wafaey.

“What we’re looking to do is raise awareness of the capabilities of the system, particularly as pertains to design professionals—architects/architectural designers and landscape architects/designers—and really open up the community.”

Wafaey says design professionals will particularly like the online design portal, which they can use to find the desired design, customise it to their individual requirements and create a downloadable file that can then be uploaded to the printer. Designers can also create and upload their own designs to the portal.

The company has carried out several ‘live demonstrations’ around the country, usually in conjunction with local councils and Wafaey says the response from the general public is always one of amazement.

“People are astounded that we can print something like an architecturally designed park bench in just 30 minutes and that that same bench is ready for use in less than 24 hours. One of the great benefits of this system is that, unlike the traditional pre-cast method, ‘freeform’ designs are achievable. That said, there are some limitations—mostly to do with physics—so there aren’t infinite options available, but the system allows for some really creative solutions.”

The system has been designed for ease of use—requiring just two people to operate it.

QOROX: so simple an apprentice can use it

“While the system can be used as the sole construction method, the way we’re positioning the technology at the moment, is as an adjunct to the existing construction programme; offering efficiencies around time and costs and therefore allowing the programme to proceed to schedule.”

Agility is one of the biggest benefits the QOROX system has to offer, says Wafaey.

“The printer itself is easily transportable and only requires a 5m x 4m footprint making it an ideal choice for compromised sites. The actual printing of forms can be done either onsite or at an offsite facility—with each scenario having various advantages. The machine produces very little noise, so if printing onsite, especially in a commercial context, the machine could potentially run 24/7. The printing process, too, is highly agile, allowing for changes to be made on the fly.

“It also has better environmental impacts than traditional concrete methods. Each project generates around one wheelbarrow-load of waste product and CyBe is looking at ways of incorporating various commercial waste products into the mortar as a way of further reducing waste going to landfill.”

Use of the system is also a case study in simplicity, says Wafaey, requiring just two people to run it—a qualified builder and an apprentice—and, it only takes two weeks’ training to learn how to use the system.

As with the more recognised "home" 3D printers, the CyBe Construction machine is able to print complex shapes quickly and efficiently.

QOROX: partnering with the construction industry

“Another of the system’s benefits is that it can be used across a wide gamut of construction applications including: residential, group housing, emergency housing, social housing and even bespoke architectural houses; commercial: structural walls, slabs, exterior walls and feature walls; landscaping: benches, planters, sculptures, retaining walls, swimming pools walls, prefab toilet blocks, bollards, climbing walls, shelters and sea walls; roading: median reservation, acoustic walls, slippage barriers and cycling and pedestrian bridges, as well as a whole host of singular projects.

“The printer works at a ‘speed’ of 4.5m2/h and is capable of ‘printing’ a single-storey home in just one week. The mortar, which can be coloured, comprises a fine sand mixed with a cementitious compound. Unlike regular concrete, there are no additional aggregates. Different thicknesses of mortar can be specified depending on the project and the heights wanting to be achieved.

“Typically, on a residential project for example, once the wall is printed, it is cured after three minutes and set after five. Twenty-four hours later it is load bearing and after 28 days, the structure will have reached 50 MPa. It’s also fully finished and doesn’t require additional cladding products.

“Councils in particular have been quick to embrace the system but we’re also experiencing a lot of interest from the private sector. The feedback we’ve been getting is that this process is really going to take off. In short, it’s here now and has the potential to shape the industry in the very near future.”

Learn more about incorporating cementitious 3D construction printing into your next project.

Get in touch with
QOROX®

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Recommended reading
Done tagging
All
Projects
Products
Professionals
Articles
Print media

Print media

Innovative system allows you to print your own house.

Words by Justin Foote

We’ve all seen the news reports of large construction firms folding, leaving contractors, clients and employees out of pocket and, oftentimes, out of options.

Razor-thin margins across the construction industry is often cited as one of the contributing factors in these companies’ collapse. Innovative solutions that help make the industry more efficient and effective, therefore, are eagerly anticipated.

One such innovation—cementitious 3D construction printing, also known as 3D concrete printing—is being championed by Hamilton-based company, QOROX.

“We’ve been offering this technology for around six months now and have seen some real uptake, especially by local council organisations,” says Managing Director, Wafaey Swelim.

“The technology was developed by a company called CyBe Construction, out of the Netherlands. Essentially it is a research and development company with a construction background and has a €100-million turnover.

“Since its inception in 2013, CyBe has completed projects in Dubai, Saudi Arabia and the Netherlands and sells its ‘printers’ globally.”

A special mortar—which can be coloured and comprises a fine sand mixed with a cementitious compound—is used to create a range of printed concrete structures, such as this park bench. The process creates no more than a single wheelbarrow-load of waste mate

QOROX: the future of construction

“The technology is still quite new, especially in New Zealand and it’s proponents are very much a collaborative community at this stage,” says Wafaey.

“What we’re looking to do is raise awareness of the capabilities of the system, particularly as pertains to design professionals—architects/architectural designers and landscape architects/designers—and really open up the community.”

Wafaey says design professionals will particularly like the online design portal, which they can use to find the desired design, customise it to their individual requirements and create a downloadable file that can then be uploaded to the printer. Designers can also create and upload their own designs to the portal.

The company has carried out several ‘live demonstrations’ around the country, usually in conjunction with local councils and Wafaey says the response from the general public is always one of amazement.

“People are astounded that we can print something like an architecturally designed park bench in just 30 minutes and that that same bench is ready for use in less than 24 hours. One of the great benefits of this system is that, unlike the traditional pre-cast method, ‘freeform’ designs are achievable. That said, there are some limitations—mostly to do with physics—so there aren’t infinite options available, but the system allows for some really creative solutions.”

The system has been designed for ease of use—requiring just two people to operate it.

QOROX: so simple an apprentice can use it

“While the system can be used as the sole construction method, the way we’re positioning the technology at the moment, is as an adjunct to the existing construction programme; offering efficiencies around time and costs and therefore allowing the programme to proceed to schedule.”

Agility is one of the biggest benefits the QOROX system has to offer, says Wafaey.

“The printer itself is easily transportable and only requires a 5m x 4m footprint making it an ideal choice for compromised sites. The actual printing of forms can be done either onsite or at an offsite facility—with each scenario having various advantages. The machine produces very little noise, so if printing onsite, especially in a commercial context, the machine could potentially run 24/7. The printing process, too, is highly agile, allowing for changes to be made on the fly.

“It also has better environmental impacts than traditional concrete methods. Each project generates around one wheelbarrow-load of waste product and CyBe is looking at ways of incorporating various commercial waste products into the mortar as a way of further reducing waste going to landfill.”

Use of the system is also a case study in simplicity, says Wafaey, requiring just two people to run it—a qualified builder and an apprentice—and, it only takes two weeks’ training to learn how to use the system.

As with the more recognised "home" 3D printers, the CyBe Construction machine is able to print complex shapes quickly and efficiently.

QOROX: partnering with the construction industry

“Another of the system’s benefits is that it can be used across a wide gamut of construction applications including: residential, group housing, emergency housing, social housing and even bespoke architectural houses; commercial: structural walls, slabs, exterior walls and feature walls; landscaping: benches, planters, sculptures, retaining walls, swimming pools walls, prefab toilet blocks, bollards, climbing walls, shelters and sea walls; roading: median reservation, acoustic walls, slippage barriers and cycling and pedestrian bridges, as well as a whole host of singular projects.

“The printer works at a ‘speed’ of 4.5m2/h and is capable of ‘printing’ a single-storey home in just one week. The mortar, which can be coloured, comprises a fine sand mixed with a cementitious compound. Unlike regular concrete, there are no additional aggregates. Different thicknesses of mortar can be specified depending on the project and the heights wanting to be achieved.

“Typically, on a residential project for example, once the wall is printed, it is cured after three minutes and set after five. Twenty-four hours later it is load bearing and after 28 days, the structure will have reached 50 MPa. It’s also fully finished and doesn’t require additional cladding products.

“Councils in particular have been quick to embrace the system but we’re also experiencing a lot of interest from the private sector. The feedback we’ve been getting is that this process is really going to take off. In short, it’s here now and has the potential to shape the industry in the very near future.”

Learn more about incorporating cementitious 3D construction printing into your next project.

Get in touch with
QOROX®

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging